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The Glass Key (1942)

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Director:

Stuart Heisler

Starring:

Alan Ladd, Veronica Lake, George Meader, Arthur Loft, Eddie Marr, Moroni Olsen, Margaret Hayes, Donald MacBride, Frances Gifford, William Bendix, Joseph Calleia, Richard Denning, Bonita Granville, Brian Donlevy

Genres:

Drama, Film Noir, Crime, Mystery-Suspense, US Classics

Origin:

USA

Certificate:

PG

Languages:

English

Running Time:

85 min

The Glass Key

synopsis


What holds interest in THE GLASS KEY is not the convoluted plot full of red herrings (until the murderer is unmasked), but the performances of the three leads--Brian Donlevy, Veronica Lake and Alan Ladd. Ladd and Lake have some good chemistry going here, especially in the scene where they first meet and find themselves immediately attracted--a flirting encounter that director Stuart Heisler uses to catch every glimmer of their star appeal as a team. Everyone takes some hard physical stunts. Lake's sock to the jaw when she encounters Brian Donlevy (as a crooked politician) turned out to be a real one. (She told him she didn't know how to pull punches). Dane Clark (in an unbilled early role) gets shoved through a plate glass window by Donlevy and into a pool. And Alan Ladd takes a brutal beating from William Bendix that is painful to even watch, it's brutally realistic. Ladd's "beating" make-up deserved an Oscar. His escape out of a broken window has him falling off an awning and crashing through the ceiling where a family is having dinner. Richard Denning has a brief role as Bonita Granville's unfortunate brother who gets killed off early in the proceedings. No use telling the plot outline--just be ready to watch the film for its authentic '40s film noir style--crisp B&W photography full of menacing shadows and some unpredictable twists and turns that will keep you guessing until the end. Ladd's icy calm is a little too guarded but watch him in the scene where Bendix takes him upstairs for a drink. Their contrasting acting styles are fun to watch--and Ladd manages to steal the scene with his underplayed cat-and-mouse expression as he casually toys with a glass or a bottle. For fans of Ladd and Lake, The Glass Key is a good one.

 
 

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